Contact us to schedule a free consultation!

Therapy Masters provides therapy in the areas of Speech, Receptive and Expressive Language Delays and Developmental Delays.

If your child struggles with one or more of the areas listed below, they could benefit from therapy. 

  • Articulation Disorders and/or Difficulties
  • Developmental Language Delays
  • Auditory Process Disorders
  • Dyspraxia/Apraxia
  • Language Processing Disorders
  • Swallowing and Feeding
  • Many more areas of difficulties that effect communication

Speech Development

Here is a guide to how children’s speech usually develops. Speech development may vary across languages. Although the age range includes up to 8 years old, many of these sounds develop earlier than that within normal development. 

Early (18 months – 3 yrs)

m, n, y, b, w, d, p, h

Middle (2 – 6 yrs)

t, ng (i.e. walking), k, g, f, v, ch, j

Later (3 – 8 yrs)

sh, zh (i.e. treasure), l, r, s, th

Children’s speech generally gets easier to understand as they get older. This is just a guide to help you as the parent/caregiver decide if there may be a concern. 

  • by 2 years of age children can be understood by familiar adults most of the time
  • by 3 years of age children can be understood by unfamiliar adults most of the time
  • by 4 years of age children can be understood by unfamiliar adults almost all of the time
  • by 5 years of age children can be understood by unfamiliar adults all of the time

How do I know if my child could benefit from Speech-Language Therapy?

The information provided below is to give you, as the parent, an idea of where your child is developmentally in regards to communication. Please contact us for further information or questions you may have about your child’s development.

Age

Expressive Language Developmental Milestones

12 months

Using anywhere from 1-3 words to communicate.

18 months

Repeat some overheard words and beginning to try to communicate with more words than gestures.

2 years

Joining words into phrases such as “more ball” or “bye mama”

2 ½ years

Beginning to use short phrases 3-4 words in length.

3 years

Should have a vocabulary of approximately 1000 words and be about 75% intelligible.

3 ½ years

Should be able to name pictures in a book, tell how an object is used, and use posessives.

4 years

Should be about 95% intelligible, even to unfamiliar listeners

4 ½ years

Able to respond to “where” questions and complete analogies

5 ½ years

Should be able to repeat sentences, use adjectives to describe objects, use past tense forms of verbs , and describe similaritites.

6 ½ years

Should be able to define words, rhyme words, and repair grammatical errors.

12 months

Using anywhere from 1-3 words to communicate.

18 months

Repeat some overheard words and beginning to try to communicate with more words than gestures.

2 years

Joining words into phrases such as “more ball” or “bye mama”

2 ½ years

Beginning to use short phrases 3-4 words in length.

3 years

Should have a vocabulary of approximately 1000 words and be about 75% intelligible.

3 ½ years

Should be able to name pictures in a book, tell how an object is used, and use posessives.

4 years

Should be about 95% intelligible, even to unfamiliar listeners

4 ½ years

Able to respond to “where” questions and complete analogies

5 ½ years

Should be able to repeat sentences, use adjectives to describe objects, use past tense forms of verbs , and describe similaritites.

6 ½ years

Should be able to define words, rhyme words, and repair grammatical errors.

Interested in learning more about Speech Language Pathology?

These additional resources have various topics addressed for parents and caregivers to search and learn more specific to your questions. 

Contact us today for a free consultation